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Regions of Morocco

Below are a few of the major regions of Morocco that tourists may consider visiting:


 

Tangier


    


On the seaside lies beautiful Tangier Bay and the Strait of Gibraltar heralding Europe. On the land side is a colourful city looking longingly toward the future from behind the medina’s white walls. Tangier, with over a million inhabitants, lives with that ambivalence. And while yesterday’s intellectuals would be hard put to find the atmosphere of their day among all the recent construction, the Tangier Med port project and blaring car horns, some of the walls still exude an air of Matisse and Bowles, and visitors can enjoy the city’s charms in the medina and on the magnificent bay.




Chefchaouen




With the mountain peaks of the Rif as a backdrop, Chefchaouèn, in the northwest part of the country, spreads its white medina over the hillside, while the Laou River below completes the picture by adding a touch of greenery. Founded in the 15C to resist Spanish and Portuguese invasions, nowadays Chefchaouèn is a small city that proudly offers visitors a beautiful and relaxing setting. 



Rabat

    

Rabat has preserved traces of its rich past. Visit the Chellah, vestiges of the Roman Sala Colonia and the royal necropolis, shared by storks; admire Hassan Tower, an unfinished minaret attesting to a grandiose project designed by Sultan Yacoub el-Mansour, whose (12C) reign saw a period of unprecedented growth. And naturally you’ll want to explore the kasbah dominating the medina. Rabat, an imperial city, the capital of Morocco and a university town, is peaceful and pleasant, but also a booming place with cultural ambitions. 





Fes, also known as Fez





Fes is a sublime imperial city, but nothing can sum up the wonders that await you here. The medina contains so many remarkable buildings that the only way to see them all is to get lost. Perhaps while strolling around town, like so many artists and intellectuals, you will be inspired by this “muse city” - a far cry from the “museum city” it might have become (the Fès-Jdid quarter and new town are worth a visit too). Everything here is so full of life, from the souks to the craftsmen and busy locals. Unforgettable! Under 2 hours away is Meknes.  Moulay Ismaïl turned Meknes into an imperial city in the 17C and it owes its most beautiful buildings to him - on the same scale as the sultan’s overweening ambitions. The imperial city, with its superb vestiges, stretches south from the medina, animated by tireless activity in the craftsmen’s souks. The new town, separated from the historic section by the Boufekrane River, was built by the French in the early 20C. Meknes is a gem on the east-west axis stretching between Fes and Rabat, and is also just thirty kilometres from the Roman site of Volubilis. 



Marrakech


         

Marrakech, capital of the south inhabited by about 900,000 Marrakchis, is a fascinating place. Dominated by the minaret of the emblematic Koutoubia, it is teeming with activities unlike anywhere else day and night. Its medina, gem of the imperial city, contains treasures of religious architecture and the famous Jemaa el Fna Square, where even a simple snack at an improvised stand can be an unforgettable moment. Jacques Majorelle was charmed by Marrakech, leaving a superb multi-coloured garden. And there are many other places to explore here, so take your time!



Essaouira 


A white and blue city lashed by the Atlantic Ocean’s waves and cooled off by its winds, Essaouira has always inspired artists, and they continue to thrive here. Travellers will enjoy exploring the medina and its lively souks protected by proud ramparts, lounging on the lovely beach nestled along the bay, and sampling freshly caught grilled fish. Essaouira is one spot west of Marrakech that you must see.




Casablanca




While most Moroccan cities bear the weight of a heavy past, this one embodies modern Morocco and foreshadows its future. It’s impossible to feel indifferent to this flashy city, an essential part of getting to know the country, of which it is the economic capital. Be sure to take in its “towers”: the minaret of the Hassan II mosque, the El Hank lighthouse, and the Twin Center; its very rich architectural heritage, much of which remains to be explored; not to mention a stroll along the Boulevard de la Corniche for the atmosphere.




Summaries taken from: http://travel.michelin.com/web/destination/Morocco/cities-regions

1 comment:

  1. Hi! Just found your blog from a Tripadvisor link. Thank you so much for sharing! I will be going to Morocco in March, so this is great information. I can't wait to see this beautiful place for myself. :)

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